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Posts Tagged ‘benefits’

Ever get the feeling you should (or shouldn’t) do something? It might not seem to fit; it might mean making others unhappy or disappointed; it may mean going back on a commitment because you’ve changed your mind; it may mean doing something you’ve never done- maybe something a little scary.

It might not be convenient in the moment, but usually the feeling (or little voice) inside proves right in the long run.

It’s difficult to justify decisions that come from your inner voice, especially living in a world that is defined by comparing yourself to others on the outside. Your sense of defined logic and reason don’t always match this inner voice. Sometimes it may even seem a little crazy!

But when you learn to pay attention to what your inner wisdom shows you, and to trust and follow that guidance, you’ll find a limitless source of information available to you (at your mental fingertips) that you can access at any time, for any situation or circumstance.

This means that with practice you will intuitively know what to do. The practice then becomes learning to follow this guidance and learning to trust yourself.

Learning to access your inner guidance can change how you approach pregnancy, birth, parenting and life.

So where do you find this voice?

Begin by tuning in to Monday’s show at 1pm ET here: A Labor of Love

The topic is Body Wisdom 101, where I’ll share some basic information about connecting with your inner guidance that you can begin to use right now. Even if you’re not a parent (and have no plans to be one) this information can help you connect with your inner guidance system.

(Don’t worry if you can’t catch the live show. The podcast is generally available for download within 24 hours after the show airs.)

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I used the title “vaccination question” because I don’t consider it a debate. We don’t debate with people outside our family about where we’re going on vacation, whether the kids should go to school or homeschool, or what to have for dinner, even when we receive suggestions, insight, and/or helpful information from others. We take in the information, discuss it, research it more sometimes, and make the choices we feel are right for our family.

We think every family has this right. And I don’t like the notion that some doctors don’t like to discuss all information available about vaccines (and what information is not available) because they are afraid parents won’t make the decision the doctor wants them to make. A big part of my skepticism is that information about risks wasn’t discussed in mainstream medicine until Autism questions forced it into the open. And even if Autism is not caused by vaccines, there are other risks that I was never warned about before vaccinating my older daughter as an infant.

No one said anything about risk – until I met a woman with a vaccine-injured child. She talked about it- you can imagine she talked about it a lot. And I discovered I had a lot of questions that I didn’t know to ask when we first chose to vaccinate. We stopped any vaccination for our oldest after 12 months, declining MMR and Chickenpox at the 12 month visit. (Our younger child has had none.)

Then I started to research online. What I found was that some diseases do pose a serious risk to some children/people- that it’s hard to define who will be affected most seriously. That wasn’t really surprising. And I read about the serious risks of vaccines for some people- and that it’s equally difficult to determine which people will have a serious reaction. I also found that other parents were upset and nervous about vaccinating; about not vaccinating; about the risks to their children from vaccines, from disease, from un-vaccinated children.

As parents we can only make decisions based on the information available. We simply don’t know what we don’t know. My reasons for currently not vaccinating are many. Among them is the idea that I believe the potential risk of damage by vaccines (not just immediate, but long-term health consequences) is greater than the risk of my children suffering long-term damage from illnesses vaccines were created to prevent.

Are there consequences I haven’t considered? Possibly. I’m willing to listen if you have a story to tell me or information to offer. I know I don’t know everything there is to possibly know about vaccines. So if you’ve got something to share, please do.

Incidentally, we were exposed to chicken-pox last week and are waiting for the arrival of spots. Each day, I check the kids and nothing yet. I’ve picked up a homeopathic remedy to use if/when the spots appear and I’m expecting that we’ll go stir crazy in the house before long. (But we may also get some needed organization and laundry done along the way to crazy.)

I’ve still got a lot of questions about vaccination. So on Monday (at 1pm ET) I’m interviewing Barbara Loe Fisher from the National Vaccine Information Center. You can access the show here. You can also call in with questions during the live show, but if you want to simply provide your opinion, I respectfully request you do so here, so that we can have as many questions answered as possible during the hour-long show.

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If you heard my recent interview with Henci Goer, you know I’m really interested in women having the information they need to make decisions for their care, especially during pregnancy. I also think women have the right to choose the care they feel most comfortable with, no matter how certain data is interpreted, or by whom, or if there is no data at all. For example, choosing midwifery vs OB care can be based on statistical data of outcomes for certain providers, or it can be based solely on how a woman feels about a particular individual.

When it comes to risks and benefits, it’s up to individual women to discern their own comfort levels, especially about safety, weighing the benefits and the risks based on her individual perspective.

Similar decisions are made by individuals all the time. For example- the option to drive or walk to the store:

I live less than 2 miles from my local grocery store. A sidewalk exists on one of the 3 roads that I need to travel. The speed limit on the roads without sidewalk is 30 mph, but enforcement is nil and generally cars travel about 40 mph. Because I live in Florida, the weather is generally nice enough to walk 90% (or more) of the time.

Benefits to Walking:

  • Walking is great cardio exercise.
  • Carrying my groceries will help me save money b/c I may not be able to carry “extras”
  • Ecological benefit- less pollution
  • Save money on gas
  • Fewer miles on car/less maintenance needed
  • Safer than driving

Risks to Walking:

  • Possibility of getting hit by car where there is no sidewalk
  • I could trip/fall
  • May take time away from other necessary activities

Benefits to Driving:

  • Faster
  • Can carry as much as I want/need to buy
  • Safer than walking

Risks to Driving:

  • Possibility of car accident (3 left turns to get to store)
  • Danger of navigating the cars backing out of parking spots
  • May spend too much money due to no limits on carry weight

If you read closely, you’ll notice each option is “safer” than the other, as listed under benefits. That’s because there is a risk of injury in both cases, and ways to be safer in both cases. I could walk on the grass shoulder; wear a seat belt; wear reflectors; drive defensively. I’m sure somewhere I could find statistics that define the probability of accidents for walking vs. driving this distance under various conditions and make a statistical comparison.

But even with a thorough review of the statistics, I get to choose which feels safer to me. Even if the data “clearly show” a greater chance of injury for one option, the benefit of speed (or a smaller carbon footprint) might outweigh the risk.

Choices should be offered to women for childbirth with the full understanding that women are ultimately responsible to choose, and that women have the right to choose for themselves, no matter how others interpret the benefits and risks involved.

After all, risks and benefits cannot always be measured and statistically defined. In birth, it’s more personal than that.

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